Iris Catches the Unicorn

Iris with her first sucker ever, a Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei). Grundy County, IL. April 17, 2016.

Iris with her first redhorse (and first sucker of any kind) ever. April 17, 2016.

As parents, we want our kids to be better than we are and to do better than we have done. The other day I got a little taste of this idea in action.

My daughters have fished as long as they’ve been able to hold a fishing pole. Both of them love it. But Iris, age 9, has developed a fishing addiction that rivals my own.

All winter we talked about the fishing we’d do when spring finally came. We talked about the species of fish found in each local stream and lake and speculated about where she’d have the best shot at catching a big carp, a pike, a gar, or a redhorse. When their birthdays came in March, the three of us went shopping and each girl got a new rod and reel, and Iris got a tackle box. A real one, with lots of space to fill. Like any dedicated angler, she brings it in the car any time there’s the slightest chance that fishing and/or lure shopping could occur.

A few weeks ago, though winter really hadn’t ended yet, Iris couldn’t take it any longer. We fished a little park pond, unsure of whether it even held any fish and, if so, what kind. The only action of the night was Iris catching the first fish of the year in our family. True to form, because this is what kids do to parents, she caught a fish that I almost never catch: a Black Crappie. Not a rare fish, not a difficult fish in general, but for some reason I rarely catch them.

  • Iris 1, Dad 0

A few days later it warmed up and I mounted my first fishing expedition of 2016, taking way too much confidence and gear to fish a great river. All I managed to do was lose two of my favorite spinners and all I could catch (aside from a thieving tree) were a scrawny White Bass and a small Freshwater Drum. Still, I was on the board.

  • Iris 1, Dad 2

After that, though, winter returned. Temps dropped (air and water), rain and then snow swelled all the creeks, and we again spent a lot of time talking about fishing and complaining about weather, making grand plans for spring. A rainy hour on the local creek brought no fish to either of us, but another quick visit to a pond got Iris a Bluegill.

  • Iris 2, Dad 2

Which Brings Us to Unicorn Day

Last week, the weather suddenly got it right. Sun, no more rain, blue skies. I semi-seriously considered taking the girls out of school for a day so we could go fishing somewhere better than a muddy little creek or a pond full of litter. If anything, the warm weather made us even more frustrated than the snow had, and by the end of the week we were both coming unhinged. Something had to be done. A plan was hatched.

On Sunday, April 17th, Iris and I packed a lunch, gathered our gear (well, most of it: I actually forgot my two main rods and had to use a spare that happened to be in the trunk) and headed for a river about an hour south. A river with no dams, clean, cold water, and lots of fish. A river that is home to at least 10 species of suckers, plus Longnose Gar, several catfish species, a bunch of bass and sunfish species, and dozens of cool minnows and other small fishes. Though it is a tributary of the Illinois River, it does not have any Silver or Bighead Carp.

A friend had caught a tuberculate River Redhorse, along with lots of other fish, a week or so earlier, so I was confident we’d get into some fish.

The day was perfect. Almost too warm, especially since the trees did not yet have leaves and there was little shade available. The water was absolutely clear, but still colder than I would have liked. Though a truck was parked at the spot and I feared having to share the river, no one was fishing there. We got our lines in the water, ate our lunches and waited. And waited. Nothing.

Iris took my Perfect Dipnet (I have to give Jonah’s Aquarium a plug here: that thing is awesome) and caught lots of tiny minnows I haven’t yet identified (and probably won’t), but the fishing was slow. When she did finally get a bite, it was a Smallmouth Bass that got off before she could land it. Other than the minnows, the only wildlife we saw was a turkey vulture that passed overhead.

A few of the darters we netted while waiting for fish to bite. Grundy County, IL. April 17, 2016.

A few of the darters we netted.

A bunch of little fish we netted while waiting for fish to bite. Grundy County, IL. April 17, 2016.

A bunch of minnows Iris netted while waiting for fish to bite. Feel free to suggest IDs in the comments, because I probably won’t get around to trying.

Lots of minnows were around, and some very small crayfish.

Iris in action. Lots of minnows were around, and some very small crayfish.

A Slow Day

We only got two bites all day. Actually, I got none and Iris got two (on her new rod). The second one was so light we didn’t even know a fish was there until we decided to check the bait. She handled it perfectly, and when the fish got close I could see it was a sucker (her first) and then that it was a redhorse. The river holds 5 (and possibly all 6) of the upper-midwestern redhorses: Shorthead, River, Golden, Silver, Black (and I suspect Greater, since they’re in neighboring streams). Iris’s fish had a gray tail and the dorsal fin and mouth of a Golden or Black. We snapped some photos, then she gave it a kiss and released it. I don’t think I was actually dancing with joy, but inside my head I was.

One of the scariest things about being the fishing addicted parent of a fishing addict kid is that I will oversell the potential of a fishing trip and it won’t pan out. It’s happened enough times that I should know better. I hate seeing the disappointment on my child’s face when she’s been skunked after I essentially promised her fish. Even worse, though, is seeing her try to hide it so I won’t feel bad. Knowing that this wouldn’t be one of those days was a huge relief (for both of us, probably).

But back to the fish. It was definitely not any of the red-tailed redhorses, and it was definitely not a Silver. Since Black Redhorse was an imaginary species (as I had established though years of trying to catch one in waters where they supposedly outnumber the other redhorses by wide margins), this one had to be a Golden. Iris didn’t care so much about the species—she was just happy to catch a fish, and doubly happy to catch a redhorse.

Moments after Iris released her fish a Bald Eagle flew over, gliding in slow motion so we’d have time to recognize the emphasis it was adding to her moment of triumph. I was too blissed out to think of grabbing the camera.

Iris before releasing her first sucker ever, a Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei). Grundy County, IL. April 17, 2016.

Iris kisses her redhorse goodbye before releasing it.

The rest of the day passed without a bite. We netted and photographed tons of cool minnows and crayfish, and a pair of fossil hunters gave Iris two rocks with 300+ million year old fern fossils.

  • Iris 3, Dad 2

We headed home content, slightly sunburned, muddy, and already making plans for our next expedition.

Say Hello to a Mythical Creature

That night I looked at the photos. Out of habit I counted scales and fin rays, and I realized something: that fish had too many scales on its lateral line to be a Golden Redhorse. A Golden will usually have around 40-43, but this one had at least 45 and maybe as many as 47, depending where you stopped counting near the tail.  I didn’t take a good shot of the pelvic fin (because the possibility that I’d need it never crossed my mind), but in the one photo that showed it mostly spread out, there appeared to be more than 9 rays. It’s a crappy photo and not included here. (For those less obsessed with this stuff, the Black Redhorse has 10 rays in one or both pelvic fins while a Golden will only have 9.)

I emailed some biologists and asked them to count scales in case I was just plain doing it wrong somehow. I didn’t tell Iris of my suspicion. The word came back that each of the biologists, including the godfather of Moxostoma science, probably the world’s foremost authority on redhorses, that Iris’s fish was, unbelievably, an adult female Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei).

A Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) caught by Iris Nelson. Grundy County, IL. April 17, 2016.

Black Redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) caught by Iris Nelson. IL. April 17, 2016. (The orange on the scales is the reflection of her shirt.

If she was proud before that news, I don’t know what to call her feeling now. When your dad is the guy who is so nuts about redhorses that he has a website named for their genus, and he never shuts up about them, and his redhorse ID art is all over the place, and then you go and catch the one redhorse species on his ID materials that he’s never seen in real life, that’s a power move. That gets you bonus points.

  • Iris 3 (x100), Dad 2

The Black Redhorse is not necessarily the most rare of Illinois’ 6 (or 7 because we also have Smallmouth Redhorse in the state, though I know little about it) species of Moxostoma, but it does seem to be caught less often than any other. I’ve personally seen more Greater Redhorses (listed as endangered in Illinois) and River Redhorses (listed as threatened) caught in this state than Black Redhorses. I don’t know exactly why, but they may be more selective feeders than the other fish in the genus.

Coincidentally, my friend Ben, who has also been seeking a Black Redhorse for years, caught his first one that same day a couple hundred miles south of us.

So, I’m now pretty sure they do exist after all, but I might not fully believe it until I catch one.

UPDATE: A little over a month later, in the same spot, I finally caught my own unicorn. Iris was a little irked that she no longer had something on her lifelist that I didn’t, but she got over it. I think she’s scheming ways to catch other species I’ve been unable to get, and I fully support her in that.

I join the unicorn catchers club.

(Thanks to Konrad Schmidt, John Lyons and Robert Jenkins for confirming my scale count and ID of Iris’s fish.)

 

A little perspective on the relative rarity of Illinois redhorses, thanks to the Illinois Natural History Survey:

First the red-tailed species: Shorthead Redhorse (M. macrolepidotum), River Redhorse (M. carinatum), Greater Redhorse (M. valenciennesi). (There is no INHS map for Smallmouth Redhorse.):

macrolepidotumcarinatumvalenciennesi

And the gray-tailed species: Golden Redhorse (M. erythrurum), Silver Redhorse (M. anisurum), Black Redhorse (M. duquesnei)

erythrurum anisurumduquesnei

The Black Redhorse isn’t as uncommon in the collection records as 2 out of 3 red-tailed redhorses, but it’s a hell of a lot rarer than its near-twin, the Golden Redhorse. (I would guess that the Silver Redhorse is more common than this map indicates.)

More dipnet photos

A bunch of little fish we netted while waiting for fish to bite. I have not yet tried to ID these fish, and probably won't. Feel free to suggest IDs. Grundy County, IL. April 17, 2016.

A bunch of little fish we netted while waiting for fish to bite, x-rayed by the sun. I have not yet tried to ID these fish, and probably won’t. Feel free to suggest IDs. Grundy County, IL. April 17, 2016.

A bunch of little fish we netted while waiting for fish to bite. I have not yet tried to ID these fish, and probably won't. Feel free to suggest IDs. Grundy County, IL. April 17, 2016.

A bunch of little fish we netted. I have not yet tried to ID these fish, and probably won’t. Feel free to suggest IDs.

This male stoneroller (I'm not going to ID it, but it's either Central or Largescale), sporting nuptial tubercles, was just lying on the bottom of the river. No obvious signs of trauma. It had been dead a while as it was completely stiff. Very cold water, so no decomposition. Grundy County, IL. April 17, 2016.

This male stoneroller (I’m not going to ID it, but it’s either Central or Largescale), sporting nuptial tubercles, was just lying on the bottom of the river. No obvious signs of trauma. It had been dead a while as it was completely stiff. Very cold water, so no decomposition. Scooped it up with the dipnet.

I don't know what species it is, but this little (I assume) sunfish was the only one of its kind we netted. Length about 1" (2.5 cm). Grundy County, IL. April 17, 2016.

I don’t know what species it is, but this little (I assume) sunfish was the only one of its kind we netted. Length about 1″ (2.5 cm).

 

 

 

 

 

Illinois Native Gar in the Legislature

Update, April 19

The Ag & Conservation Committee has adopted the resolution with a 13-0 vote. Thank you to everyone who registered support for this legislation. All our names were read into the record as proponents, there was a quick inside joke from one representative to another about hunting gar from a pirogue, and then it was done. The whole thing took less than 5 minutes.

Now the resolution will be “reported to the floor” of the House. This does not mean that the resolution will automatically be brought to a vote, however. We now have to concentrate our efforts on convincing those in charge of what gets a vote that this resolution is worthy of consideration by the full House. I will post more information as I have it.

This is a great day for native fishes in general, and our four gars in particular. HJR0141, the first resolution of its kind in this state, has passed out of committee on a unanimous, bipartisan vote. We will continue to work to get the Senate to consider the resolution as well, and to get the House to pass it. Stay tuned…

“Testify” in Support of Illinois Gar

A resolution in the Illinois legislature that urges the Illinois DNR to protect our four native gar species as and where necessary, and to continue and expedite the ongoing reintroduction of alligator gar to the state, will have its first hearing tomorrow morning (Tues., April 19, 2016) in the House Agriculture and Conservation Committee. If it passes there, it will go to the full House for a vote. If it dies there…

To virtually “testify” in support of the resolution, please visit:
http://my.ilga.gov/WitnessSlip/Create/97137?committeeHearingId=13671&LegislationId=97137&HCommittees4%2F25%2F2016-page=1&committeeid=0&chamber=H&nodays=7&_=1461018731945

Type in your info, choose “proponent,” and select “record of appearance only”.

That’s it. No testimony required. (But if you know who your Representative is, please feel free to email them about your support for this resolution.)

This has to be done before the hearing, so please take a few moments and do it tonight.

Synopsis of the Resolution

HJR0141
Urges the Illinois Department of Natural Resources to develop protections as needed for all Illinois native gar species to ensure the long term viability of the shortnose gar, the longnose gar, the spotted gar, and the alligator gar, with particular protections developed for alligator gar. Urges the Illinois Department of Natural Resources to apply these protections as needed and include site specific size and creel limits based on the size of the reproductively mature gar to protect brood stock from premature harvest. Urges the Illinois Department of Natural Resources to work with partners to identify ways to expand and expedite the reintroduction of alligator gar to waterways to expedite the creation of a sustainable and regulated trophy fishing resource in the State.
(From http://ilga.gov/legislation/BillStatus.asp?DocNum=141&GAID=13&DocTypeID=HJR&LegId=97137&SessionID=88&GA=99)

The resolution is supported by Illinois DNR, The Sierra Club and other environmental groups, numerous scientists and anglers, and the Bowfishing Alliance.

Full Text

SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION (The text of the Senate and House versions of the resolution are identical.)

WHEREAS, Since prehistoric times, Illinois waterways have been home to four species of gar that swam alongside dinosaurs, mastodons, and pioneers; and

WHEREAS, Alligator gar reaching more than six feet in length and 300 pounds in weight once patrolled Illinois waterways; and

WHEREAS, For a century, gar have been misnamed as nuisances, threats to sportfish, “trash fish”, or worse; and

WHEREAS, The largest of these species, the alligator gar, was once extirpated from our State, but has been reintroduced on a limited basis through the hard work, expertise, and commitment of our Department of Natural Resources; and

WHEREAS, Our great institutions of higher education, consisting of the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana and Springfield campuses, Western Illinois University, and Eastern Illinois University, are engaged in research showing the intrinsic value of gar species to Illinois waterways, sport fisheries, and recreational opportunities; and

WHEREAS, Anglers, whether they use hook-and-line or and arrows to pursue their quarry, are discovering the thrill of gar fishing; and

WHEREAS, Food lovers across the State are beginning to discover the culinary delight that is the flesh of gar; and

WHEREAS, The increasing popularity of gar presents new opportunities for gar management to ensure the long-term viability of the fishery; and

WHEREAS, Fully grown alligator gar is our only native species capable of eating adult Asian carp; and

WHEREAS, Many Illinoisans and tourists look forward to the day when giant alligator gar will again swim our waterways, presenting a unique trophy fishing opportunity; and

WHEREAS, Gar have for too long been falsely accused of hurting game species, when studies clearly show healthy gar populations lead to healthier game species populations; and

WHEREAS, The Illinois Department of Natural Resources has taken a two-year hiatus from their efforts to restore the alligator gar population; therefore, be it

RESOLVED, BY THE SENATE OF THE NINETY-NINTH GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS, THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES CONCURRING HEREIN, that we urge the Illinois Department of Natural Resources to develop protections as needed for all Illinois native gar species to ensure the long term viability of the shortnose gar (Lepisosteus platostomus), the longnose gar (Lepisosteus osseus), the spotted gar (Lepisosteus occulatus), and the alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula), with particular protections developed for alligator gar; and be it further

RESOLVED, That we urge the Illinois Department of Natural Resources to apply these protections as needed and include site specific size and creel limits based on the size of the reproductively mature gar to protect brood stock from premature harvest; and be it further

RESOLVED, That we urge the Illinois Department of Natural Resources to work with partners to identify ways to expand and expedite the reintroduction of alligator gar to waterways to expedite the creation of a sustainable and regulated trophy fishing resource in the State; and be it further

RESOLVED, That a suitable copy of this resolution be delivered to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources.